New publication: ‘Collective Voices and the Materialisation of Ideas: The Monster as Methods’

Image description: the cover of the anthology Monstrous Ontologies: Politics, Ethics, Materiality. The cover shows a blurred black and white picture of gnarly trees.

The Monster Network has written a chapter on monster methods for the exciting new anthology, Monstrous Ontologies: Politics Ethics Materiality, edited by Caterina Nirta and Andrea Pavoni. The anthology collects the contributions from the conference Monstrous Ontologies, which took place at University of Roehampton on July 1st 2019. Our chapter, ‘Collective Voices and the Materialisation of Ideas: The Monster as Methods’, is based on our keynote from that conference. The keynote is also available as a Monster Talks podcast episode.

Monsters of the Anthropocene: Reading group meeting March 18th

Non humans only’ (2011) by Tove Kjellmark. Image description: a glass case on a metal trolley. The class case is filled with toy animals whose fur has been removed. A thick line of cords is connected to the glass case, and there is a painting of a small child hanging on the white wall next to the glass case. There is a window directly behind the glass case.

Tomorrow is the second meeting of the Monsters of the Anthropocene reading group series! We will meet 14:00 – 15:30 Oslo time and discuss the first chapter of Astrida Neimanis’ book Bodies of Water.

If you’re on the Monsters of the Anthropocene mailing-list, you should have received an email with Zoom link and more information about the meeting – if you haven’t, let us know! If you want to join the mailing-list, let us know!

Please notice that tomorrow is last chance to join the reading group, as we will be closing it to allow people to get to know each other and collaborate on projects. The reading group runs for two years and forms part of the Monsters of the Anthropocene Collaboratory at the Oslo School of Environmental Humanities.

We look forward to seeing you tomorrow! And if you cannot stay out of the waters till then, why not read Celina Stifjell’s blog-post about sea monsters, ‘She-Monsters of the Anthropocene!’, right here on the Monster Network blog?

Monsters of the Anthropocene – info out now

‘Non humans only’ (2011) by Tove Kjellmark. Image description: a glass case on a metal trolley. The class case is filled with toy animals whose fur has been removed. A thick line of cords is connected to the glass case, and there is a painting of a small child hanging on the white wall next to the glass case. There is a window directly behind the glass case.

If you have signed up for the Monsters of the Anthropocene reading group series, you should have received an e-mail with information about tomorrow’s meeting by now. If not, feel free to contact us via this website.

We look forward to seeing you!

Monsters of the Anthropocene: Collaboratory at the Oslo School of Environmental Humanities

The Monster Network is excited to announce that we have received funding from the Oslo School of Environmental Humanities to establish a two-year Collaboratory called Monsters of the Anthropocene. The Collaboratory PI is Rebecca Scherr, and it is created in collaboration with Hugo Reinert.

‘Non humans only’ (2011) by Tove Kjellmark. Image description: a glass case on a metal trolley. The class case is filled with toy animals whose fur has been removed. A thick line of cords is connected to the glass case, and there is a painting of a small child hanging on the white wall next to the glass case. There is a window directly behind the glass case.

Drawing on feminist theory, decolonial theory, queer theory and critical disability studies, the Monsters of the Anthropocene Collaboratory invites creative and critical engagements with the figure of the monster in order to address questions of power, vulnerability and othering in the Anthropocene. To do so, the Collaboratory hosts a reading group series as well as a series of workshops and a mini-podcast series produced in collaboration with the University of Stavanger as part of the Monster Network’s regular podcast series Monster Talks.  The aim of the Collaboratory is to foster interdisciplinary collaborations as well as create a space for co-writing research grant applications. In other words, we aim for the Collaboratory to be the beginnings of bigger and even more monstrous things yet to come.

If you are interested in participating in this monstrousness, you’re welcome to join us – the first two reading group meetings are open to all and take place on the 4th of February and 18th of March, both at 14:00 – 15:30 Oslo time on Zoom.  After the 18th of March, we close the reading group meetings in order to allow the core group to focus on collaborations and research proposal writing. The workshops, however, remain open for all.

If you would like to participate in the first reading group meetings to find out if this is something for you, feel free to contact us at promisesofmonsters [at] gmail [dot] com to hear more and to get the Zoom link and password.

We will update this website with news of lectures, workshops and other events relating to the Monsters of the Anthropocene Collaboratory, but you can also read more at our OSEH website.

Monsters of the Anthropocene: an OSEH Collaboratory (2021/22)

Ghost_trees_in_snow_2
Image description: Ghost Trees in Snow, Wikimedia Commons. Sheila Sund from Salem, United States. Image description: Snowy landscape. Two spruces covered in snow are almost swallowed by a white fog. The fog erases the line between ground and horizon.

We’re happy and excited to announce that the Monster Network has received funding for a two-year Collaboratory at the Oslo School of Environmental Humanities, the University of Oslo, together with Rebecca Scherr (internal PI) and Hugo Reinert! The Collaboratory will take the shape of a reading group, and we will organize two workshops on the subjects of the monstrous and the Anthropocene. Keep an eye on our website for more information on the latest developments and possible ways of getting involved with the Collaboratory.  

Until then (and after): beware the monsters of the Anthropocene.