Weird Ecologies: new website for the upcoming event!

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The seminar explores the ethics and politics of storytelling, especially in regards to telling stories about nature and ‘the Other’. Issues addressed are, for example, how we may think critically about shifting biotechnological landscapes, environmental change and the very notion of “nature” as specific, but also potentially changing, storytelling practices.

Contributors to the seminar are scholars and artists working with questions of embodiment, vulnerability, human–non-human relations, eco-criticism, activism, and embodied storytelling practices. We invite participants to engage directly with academic and artistic practices in order to explore ways in which to imagine livable presents/futures in the midst of cultural anxieties concerning human extinction and the end of the world.

Confirmed speakers: The Monster Network, author Johanna Sinisalo, Dr. Toni Lahtinen (University of Tampere), and author Laura Gustafsson.
Writing workshop with Professor Emerita Nina Lykke.

The seminar is free of charge (dinner, lunches and coffees are free for registered participants and invited guests). The language of the event is English.

Organised by the Monster Network and the project ‘Environmental Risks, Dystopias and Myths in Contemporary Literature’. In collaboration with The Ecocritical Network for Scandinavian Studies (ENSCAN). Funded by Nordic Culture Point.

Find the preliminary programme and register on the event’s website.

Monster Talks 1: Why the monster and why now?

In 2018, we have seen worldwide celebrations Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, where the monster in many ways has become a symbol for the monstrous, the unwanted and the not-quite human. However, Christian Beyer from Tromsø, the Arctic University of Norway, Dr. Line Henriksen from the University of Copenhagen and Dr. Siv Frøydis Berg from the Norwegian National Library have all embraced the monster as an important and highly relevant figure to keep thinking with. What is it about the monster that continues to draw our attention?

Monster Talks is a podcast series that explores the figure of the monster and the concept of the monstrous as important thinking tools for addressing dynamics of power, inclusion and exclusion, discrimination and violence. The podcast is made possible by the support of Nordic Culture Point and produced by The Monster Network in collaboration with Network for Gender Studies at UiS. All episodes are available from the podcast’s website at UiS.

Final programme: Haunted Humanity

Haunted Humanity: Workshop by The Monster Network

Thursday November 29  – Friday November 30 at Stavanger Kunsthall and The University of Stavanger (UiS)

In light of so-called migratory challenges and increasing nationalism in the Nordic countries, this workshop critically engages with ongoing debates about exclusion and inclusion through the ideas surrounding monsters, ghosts and haunting. The workshop explores not only important historical contexts for how monsters emerged as justifications for discrimination and violence, but also the monstrous Others as figures that haunt the foundations of the very idea of humanity, and what it means to be human today.

The workshop is supported by the Nordic Culture point and is free of charge. Continue reading “Final programme: Haunted Humanity”

Haunted Humanity: programme

 

Haunted Humanity: Workshop by The Monster Network

Thursday November 29  – Friday November 30 at Stavanger Kunsthall and The University of Stavanger (UiS)

In light of so-called migratory challenges and increasing nationalism in the Nordic countries, this workshop critically engages with ongoing debates about exclusion and inclusion through the ideas surrounding monsters, ghosts and haunting. The workshop explores not only important historical contexts for how monsters emerged as justifications for discrimination and violence, but also the monstrous Others as figures that haunt the foundations of the very idea of humanity, and what it means to be human today.

To participate, email ingvil.f.hellstrand@uis.no before November 7st. The workshop is supported by the Nordic Culture point and is free of charge.

Program: Continue reading “Haunted Humanity: programme”

Save the dates!

We’re scheming, and we want you to be part of our plans! Due to a generous grant from the Nordic Culture Point, the Monster Network will be organizing two workshops:

  • Haunted Humanity in Stavanger, Norway on 29-30 November 2018.
  • Weird Ecologies in Tampere, Finland on 4-5 April 2019.

We will soon update this website with more information about the workshops, so keep peeling those eyeballs!

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New Monster Network publication: Promises of Monsters

Soma coverIn 2016 the Monster Network organised the international conference Promises of Monsters at the University of Stavanger. In our own humble opinion, the conference was nothing short of fantastic, and for close to two years we have been working on a publication based on the themes and debates raised by the fabulous speakers and artists. That publication has now seen the dawn of day and  – as any unholy creature would – is roaming the world, looking for trouble and its creators. Want to find it before it finds us? Get your special issue of Somatechnics: Promises of Monsters right here! You can read the introduction Promises, Monsters and Methodologies: the Ethics, Politics and Poetics of the Monstrous for free.  You can also read more about the publication in its entirety in this blog-post by Donna McCormack.

Special Issue on the Monstrous

coverDr. Donna McCormack (Lecturer in English Literature at the University of Surrey) speaks about the recent Special Issue of the journal Somatechnics that she edited with the steering committee of the Monster Network.

The Monster Network has been busy doing collective work and is happy to announce the publication of a special issue of the journal Somatechnics on Promises, Monsters, Methodologies: The Ethics, Politics and Poetics of the Monstrous (September 2018).

The Special Issue started as a collaborative project between the five editors, who are all steering committee members of the Monster Network. Most of us have worked together for many years, while others came along later consolidating our desire to think about the future of monster studies, and to address whether there is such a thing as monster studies. Continue reading “Special Issue on the Monstrous”